UNRAVELING by Orenstein NOTE: MEETING ONLINE

Women's Biography
Monday, June 10, 7:30 pm

The Women's Biography Book Group is led by Doris Feinsilber and meets the 2nd Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. The book group is meeting online. Participants limited to 20 sign ups. Please contact bookgroups@politics-prose for information.

Unraveling: What I Learned About Life While Shearing Sheep, Dyeing Wool, and Making the World's Ugliest Sweater By Peggy Orenstein Cover Image

Unraveling: What I Learned About Life While Shearing Sheep, Dyeing Wool, and Making the World's Ugliest Sweater (Paperback)

$18.99


In Stock—Click for Locations
Politics and Prose at 5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
2 on hand, as of Jun 25 1:20am
Politics and Prose at The Wharf (610 Water St SW)
1 on hand, as of Jun 17 2:20pm
Politics and Prose at Union Market (1324 4th Street NE)
1 on hand, as of Jun 25 1:35am

“Orenstein is such a breezy, funny writer, it’s easy to forget she’s an important thinker too.”—People

In this lively, funny memoir, Peggy Orenstein sets out to make a sweater from scratch—shearing, spinning, dyeing wool—and in the process discovers how we find our deepest selves through craft. Orenstein spins a yarn that will appeal to everyone.  

The COVID pandemic propelled many people to change their lives in ways large and small. Some adopted puppies. Others stress-baked. Peggy Orenstein, a lifelong knitter, went just a little further. To keep herself engaged and cope with a series of seismic shifts in family life, she set out to make a garment from the ground up: learning to shear sheep, spin and dye yarn, then knitting herself a sweater.

Orenstein hoped the project would help her process not just wool but her grief over the recent death of her mother and the decline of her dad, the impending departure of her college-bound daughter, and other thorny issues of aging as a woman in a culture that by turns ignores and disdains them. What she didn’t expect was a journey into some of the major issues of our time: climate anxiety, racial justice, women’s rights, the impact of technology, sustainability, and, ultimately, the meaning of home.

With her wry voice, sharp intelligence, and exuberant honesty, Orenstein shares her year-long journey as daughter, wife, mother, writer, and maker—and teaches us all something about creativity and connection. 

Peggy Orenstein is the New York Times bestselling author of Boys & SexDon’t Call Me PrincessGirls & SexCinderella Ate My DaughterWaiting for DaisyFlux, and Schoolgirls. A frequent contributor to the New York Times, she has written for the Washington PostThe AtlanticAfar, The New Yorker, and other publications, and has contributed commentary to NPR’s All Things Considered and PBS NewsHour. She lives in Northern California.

Product Details ISBN: 9780063081734
ISBN-10: 0063081733
Publisher: Harper Paperbacks
Publication Date: January 23rd, 2024
Pages: 224
Language: English

"The last few years have unspooled us all. Peggy Orenstein gathers us close, then weaves something hopeful and new in this surprisingly moving yarn about yarn." — Bonnie Tsui, bestselling author of Why We Swim and American Chinatown

Unraveling is a delight. A meditation on life, and how, if we miss a step (or a stitch), our lives (our sweaters) can unravel at record speed. Funny, moving, and brilliantly written and researched. I will never look at sheep again without a sense of wonder and awe." — Julianna Margulies

"A charming memoir of a quietly transformative year." — Kirkus Reviews

"This snapshot of creative self-discovery will enlighten readers." — Publishers Weekly

"Entertaining and informative . . . . Orenstein tenaciously approaches her subject from every angle, literally wrestling it to the ground . . . . While Orenstein’s garment is the work of an amateur, this book is anything but." — Washington Post

"This witty, irreverent memoir is, at heart, extremely serious . . . . Tucked among these tasks, which she tackles with verve and writes about with breezy humor, are lessons about the origins of clothing, the importance of women's work and the enormous toll the garment industry takes on the environment."”” — Star Tribune

"A larger-than-expected journey . . . . By book’s end, the reader is ready to identify deep, intrinsic beauty in anything that difficult to create. You just may need to read the book to see that." — San Francisco Chronicle

"Dedicated crafters will particularly enjoy this pandemic-times memoir, but the appeal goes far beyond. The sweater may be ugly, but the journey is beautiful." — Booklist

"Orenstein recounts her adventures in learning new skills with the openness and keen observations of a wise friend. This is a delight to read and will be of interest not only to crafters but also to anyone who’s learned something new as an adult." — Library Journal

"Illuminating, informative and often funny . . . . Orenstein is an impressively intrepid figure throughout this charming and candid memoir in essays . . . . An entertaining chronicle of a challenging year wonderfully well spent. Creativity and craft can soothe anxiety, encourage connection and spark joy; Orenstein’s book will do the same." — BookPage



UNRAVELING by Orenstein NOTE: Meeting Online

Women's Biography
Monday, May 13, 7:30 pm

The Women's Biography Book Group is led by Doris Feinsilber and meets the 2nd Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. The book group is meeting online. Participants limited to 20 sign ups. Please contact bookgroups@politics-prose for information.

Unraveling: What I Learned About Life While Shearing Sheep, Dyeing Wool, and Making the World's Ugliest Sweater By Peggy Orenstein Cover Image

Unraveling: What I Learned About Life While Shearing Sheep, Dyeing Wool, and Making the World's Ugliest Sweater (Paperback)

$18.99


In Stock—Click for Locations
Politics and Prose at 5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
2 on hand, as of Jun 25 1:20am
Politics and Prose at The Wharf (610 Water St SW)
1 on hand, as of Jun 17 2:20pm
Politics and Prose at Union Market (1324 4th Street NE)
1 on hand, as of Jun 25 1:35am

“Orenstein is such a breezy, funny writer, it’s easy to forget she’s an important thinker too.”—People

In this lively, funny memoir, Peggy Orenstein sets out to make a sweater from scratch—shearing, spinning, dyeing wool—and in the process discovers how we find our deepest selves through craft. Orenstein spins a yarn that will appeal to everyone.  

The COVID pandemic propelled many people to change their lives in ways large and small. Some adopted puppies. Others stress-baked. Peggy Orenstein, a lifelong knitter, went just a little further. To keep herself engaged and cope with a series of seismic shifts in family life, she set out to make a garment from the ground up: learning to shear sheep, spin and dye yarn, then knitting herself a sweater.

Orenstein hoped the project would help her process not just wool but her grief over the recent death of her mother and the decline of her dad, the impending departure of her college-bound daughter, and other thorny issues of aging as a woman in a culture that by turns ignores and disdains them. What she didn’t expect was a journey into some of the major issues of our time: climate anxiety, racial justice, women’s rights, the impact of technology, sustainability, and, ultimately, the meaning of home.

With her wry voice, sharp intelligence, and exuberant honesty, Orenstein shares her year-long journey as daughter, wife, mother, writer, and maker—and teaches us all something about creativity and connection. 

Peggy Orenstein is the New York Times bestselling author of Boys & SexDon’t Call Me PrincessGirls & SexCinderella Ate My DaughterWaiting for DaisyFlux, and Schoolgirls. A frequent contributor to the New York Times, she has written for the Washington PostThe AtlanticAfar, The New Yorker, and other publications, and has contributed commentary to NPR’s All Things Considered and PBS NewsHour. She lives in Northern California.

Product Details ISBN: 9780063081734
ISBN-10: 0063081733
Publisher: Harper Paperbacks
Publication Date: January 23rd, 2024
Pages: 224
Language: English

"The last few years have unspooled us all. Peggy Orenstein gathers us close, then weaves something hopeful and new in this surprisingly moving yarn about yarn." — Bonnie Tsui, bestselling author of Why We Swim and American Chinatown

Unraveling is a delight. A meditation on life, and how, if we miss a step (or a stitch), our lives (our sweaters) can unravel at record speed. Funny, moving, and brilliantly written and researched. I will never look at sheep again without a sense of wonder and awe." — Julianna Margulies

"A charming memoir of a quietly transformative year." — Kirkus Reviews

"This snapshot of creative self-discovery will enlighten readers." — Publishers Weekly

"Entertaining and informative . . . . Orenstein tenaciously approaches her subject from every angle, literally wrestling it to the ground . . . . While Orenstein’s garment is the work of an amateur, this book is anything but." — Washington Post

"This witty, irreverent memoir is, at heart, extremely serious . . . . Tucked among these tasks, which she tackles with verve and writes about with breezy humor, are lessons about the origins of clothing, the importance of women's work and the enormous toll the garment industry takes on the environment."”” — Star Tribune

"A larger-than-expected journey . . . . By book’s end, the reader is ready to identify deep, intrinsic beauty in anything that difficult to create. You just may need to read the book to see that." — San Francisco Chronicle

"Dedicated crafters will particularly enjoy this pandemic-times memoir, but the appeal goes far beyond. The sweater may be ugly, but the journey is beautiful." — Booklist

"Orenstein recounts her adventures in learning new skills with the openness and keen observations of a wise friend. This is a delight to read and will be of interest not only to crafters but also to anyone who’s learned something new as an adult." — Library Journal

"Illuminating, informative and often funny . . . . Orenstein is an impressively intrepid figure throughout this charming and candid memoir in essays . . . . An entertaining chronicle of a challenging year wonderfully well spent. Creativity and craft can soothe anxiety, encourage connection and spark joy; Orenstein’s book will do the same." — BookPage



EMPRESS OF THE NILE by Olson NOTE: Meeting Online

Women's Biography
Monday, May 13, 7:30 pm

The Women's Biography Book Group is led by Doris Feinsilber and meets the 2nd Monday of each month at 7:30 p.m. The book group is meeting online. Participants limited to 20 sign ups. Please contact bookgroups@politics-prose for information.

Empress of the Nile: The Daredevil Archaeologist Who Saved Egypt's Ancient Temples from Destruction By Lynne Olson Cover Image

Empress of the Nile: The Daredevil Archaeologist Who Saved Egypt's Ancient Temples from Destruction (Paperback)

$23.00


In Stock—Click for Locations
Politics and Prose at 5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
4 on hand, as of Jun 25 1:20am
Politics and Prose at The Wharf (610 Water St SW)
1 on hand, as of Jun 17 2:20pm
Politics and Prose at Union Market (1324 4th Street NE)
1 on hand, as of Jun 25 1:35am
New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice • The remarkable story of the intrepid French archaeologist who led the international effort to save ancient Egyptian temples from the floodwaters of the Aswan Dam, by the New York Times bestselling author of Madame Fourcade’s Secret War

“A female version of the Indiana Jones story . . . [Christiane Desroches-Noblecourt] was a daredevil whose real-life antics put Hollywood fiction to shame.”—The Guardian

In the 1960s, the world’s attention was focused on a nail-biting race against time: the international campaign to save a dozen ancient Egyptian temples from drowning in the floodwaters of the gigantic new Aswan High Dam. But the coverage of this unprecedented rescue effort completely overlooked the daring French archaeologist who made it all happen. Without the intervention of Christiane Desroches-Noblecourt, the temples—including the Temple of Dendur, now at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art—would currently be at the bottom of a vast reservoir. It was an unimaginably complex project that required the fragile sandstone temples to be dismantled and rebuilt on higher ground.

Willful and determined, Desroches-Noblecourt refused to be cowed by anyone or anything. As a member of the French Resistance in World War II she survived imprisonment by the Nazis; in her fight to save the temples she defied two of the most daunting leaders of the postwar world, Egypt’s President Abdel Nasser and France’s President Charles de Gaulle. As she told one reporter, “You don’t get anywhere without a fight, you know.”

Desroches-Noblecourt also received help from a surprising source. Jacqueline Kennedy, America’s new First Lady, persuaded her husband to help fund the rescue effort. After a century and a half of Western plunder of Egypt’s ancient monuments, Desroches-Noblecourt helped instead to preserve a crucial part of that cultural heritage.
Lynne Olson is the New York Times bestselling author of Madame Fourcade’s Secret War, Last Hope Island, Those Angry Days, and Citizens of London. She has been a consulting historian for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., and the National WWII Museum in New Orleans. She lives in Washington, D.C.
Product Details ISBN: 9780525509486
ISBN-10: 0525509488
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
Publication Date: February 20th, 2024
Pages: 448
Language: English
“Olson relates in this fast-paced, highly entertaining book. The highlight of Olson’s book is her thrilling account of the rescue of the giant statues of Rameses II and the Abu Simbel temples from inundation by the Aswan High Dam.”The New York Times Book Review (Editors’ Choice)

“Olson, whose many previous books spotlight unsung heroes and heroines of that war, is here at her best . . . Empress of the Nile tells her story well, embedding it in the history of modern Egyptian archaeology. Empress of the Nile is a welcome and needed work of both rescue and reclamation.”—The Washington Post

“Olson provides a gripping account of an extraordinary life.”Booklist, starred review

“Enriched by fascinating digressions into Egyptian history, museum rivalries, the plundering of archaeological sites, the 1956 Suez Crisis, and more, this is a captivating portrait of a pathbreaking woman. Readers will be enthralled.”Publishers Weekly, starred review

“A well-documented and sensitive portrait of a remarkable woman who shared her passion for Egypt and inspired so many others to find their calling, myself included, while at the same time helping to reinvigorate the Louvre.”—Henri Loyrette, Honorary President and Director of the Louvre Museum    

“Lynne Olson’s many fans know her gift for storytelling and bringing to life heroes who may not be well known but demand—indeed, rivet—our attention. Readers will devour this wonderful book.”—Evan Thomas, New York Times bestselling author of First: Sandra Day O’Connor

“An exhilarating, in-depth look at a woman whose courage never faltered. Olson’s richly detailed biography takes the reader for a magnificent ride in this heart-stopping read.”—Fiona Davis, New York Times bestselling author of The Magnolia Palace

“Once again, Lynne Olson introduces us to a modern heroine who defied the odds and achieved historic results. With her signature deep research and compassion for quirky characters, Olson spins an inspiring tale with a sometimes surprising cast. Empress of the Nile is a tonic for our times and a reminder that one unstoppable woman can bend history to her will.”—Kati Marton, New York Times bestselling author of The Chancellor

Empress of the Nile is the best sort of micro history: both an intimate portrait of a groundbreaking woman and a whirlwind tour through the major events and personalities of the twentieth century. To anyone who ever tossed a coin into the waters around the Temple of Dendur—you must read this book.”—Lauren Willig, New York Times bestselling author of Band of Sisters

“Lynne Olson has found yet another fascinating, unsung heroine: a French archaeologist with the moxie to take on the Egyptians, the Americans and the French to save historic Egyptian temples.”—Meryl Gordon, author of three biographies including Bunny Mellon: The Life of an American Style Legend

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