A CONFEDERACY OF DUNCES, by Toole

Daytime
Wednesday, December 20, 12:30 pm

** The Daytime Book Group will meet at a private home in December. **

A Confederacy of Dunces (Evergreen Book) By John Kennedy Toole, Walker Percy (Foreword by) Cover Image

A Confederacy of Dunces (Evergreen Book) (Paperback)

$16.00


In Stock—Click for Locations
Politics and Prose at 5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
3 on hand, as of Jun 25 5:20am
Politics and Prose at Union Market (1324 4th Street NE)
2 on hand, as of Jun 25 1:35am
Winner of the Pulitzer Prize

"A masterwork . . . the novel astonishes with its inventiveness . . . it is nothing less than a grand comic fugue."--The New York Times Book Review

A Confederacy of Dunces is an American comic masterpiece. John Kennedy Toole's hero, one Ignatius J. Reilly, is "huge, obese, fractious, fastidious, a latter-day Gargantua, a Don Quixote of the French Quarter. His story bursts with wholly original characters, denizens of New Orleans' lower depths, incredibly true-to-life dialogue, and the zaniest series of high and low comic adventures" (Henry Kisor, Chicago Sun-Times).

John Kennedy Toole, a native of New Orleans, graduated from Tulane University and received a master's degree in English from Columbia University. He taught at Hunter College, the University of Southwestern Louisiana, and Dominican College in New Orleans. His only other novel, The Neon Bible, is also published by Grove Press.
Product Details ISBN: 9780802130204
ISBN-10: 0802130208
Publisher: Grove Press
Publication Date: January 21st, 1994
Pages: 416
Language: English
Series: Evergreen Book

Pulitzer Prize Winner

A masterwork . . . the novel astonishes with its inventiveness . . . it is nothing less than a grand comic fugue.The New York Times Book Review

A corker, an epic comedy, a rumbling, roaring avalanche of a book.The Washington Post

An astonishingly good novel, radiant with intelligence and artful high comedy.Newsweek

One of the funniest books ever written . . . it will make you laugh out loud till your belly aches and your eyes water.The New Republic

The episodes explode one after the other like fireworks on a stormy night. No doubt about it, this book is destined to become a classic.The Baltimore Sun

The dialogue is superbly mad. You simply sweep along, unbelievably entranced.The Boston Globe

An astonishingly original and assured comic spree.New York Magazine

As hilarious as it indisputably is, A Confederacy of Dunces is a serious and important work. Los Angeles Herald Examiner

"If a book's price is measured against the laughs it provokes, A Confederacy of Dunces is the bargain of the year." Time

A brilliant and evocative novel. San Francisco Chronicle

"I found myself laughing out loud again and again as I read this ribald book." Christian Science Monitor

Crazy magnificent once-in-a-blue-moon first novel. . . . There is a touch of genius about Toole and what he has created. Publishers Weekly

A masterpiece of character comedy . . . brilliant, relentless, delicious, perhaps even classic. Kirkus Reviews

Astonishing, extravagant, lunatic, satiric, and peculiar, but it is above all genuine, skillful, and unsentimentally comic. Booklist

Ignatius J. Reilly is Bette Midlers favorite hero of fiction (Vanity Fair, August 2008)



GROWING UP, by Baker

Daytime
Wednesday, November 15, 12:30 pm
Growing Up By Russell Baker Cover Image

Growing Up (Paperback)

$16.00


In Stock—Click for Locations
Politics and Prose at 5015 Connecticut Avenue NW
1 on hand, as of Jun 25 5:20am
Russell Baker’s Pulitzer Prize-winning autobiography about growing up in America during the Great Depression.
 
“Magical….He has taken such raw, potentially wrenching material and made of it a story so warm, so likable, and so disarmingly funny…a work of original biographical art.”—The New York Times
 
In this heartfelt memoir, groundbreaking Pulitzer-winning New York Times columnist Russell Baker traces his youth from the backwoods mountains of Virginia to a New Jersey commuter town to the Depression-shadowed landscape of Baltimore.

His is a story of adversity and courage, the poignancy of love and the awkwardness of sex, of family bonds and family tensions. We meet the people who influenced Baker’s early life: his strong and loving mother, his bold little sister Doris, the awesome matriarch Ida Rebecca and her twelve sons. Here, too, are schoolyard bullies, great teachers, and the everyday heroes and heroines of the Depression who faced disaster with good cheer as they tried to muddle through.
  
A modern day classic filled with perfect turns of phrase and traces of quiet wisdom, Growing Up is a coming of age story that is “the stuff of American legend” (The Washington Post Book World).
Russell Baker charmed readers with his astute political commentary and biting cerebral wit. The noted journalist, humorist, essayist, and biographer wrote or edited seventeen books, and was the author of the nationally syndicated “Observer” column for the New York Times from 1962 to 1998. Called by Robert Sherrill of the Washington Post Book Word, “the supreme satirist of this half-century,” Baker was most famous for turning the daily gossip of most newspapers into the stuff of laugh-out-loud literature. John Skow of Time described Baker's work as “funny, but full of the pain and absurdity of the age...he can write with a hunting strain of melancholy, with delight, or...with shame or outrage.” Baker received his first Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary in 1979, in recognition of his "Observer" column. Baker received his second Pulitzer Prize in 1983 for his autobiography, Growing Up (1983).

In addition to his regular column and numerous books, Baker also edited the anthologies, The Norton Book of Light Verse (1986) and Russell Baker's Book of American Humor (1993). From 1993 to 2004 he was the regular host of the PBS television series Masterpiece Theatre. Baker was a regular contributor to national periodicals such as The New York Times MagazineSports Illustrated, Saturday Evening Post, and McCalls. One of his columns, “How to Hypnotize Yourself into Forgetting the Vietnam War,” was dramatized and filmed by Eli Wallach for PBS. Baker died in 2019 at the age of 93.
Product Details ISBN: 9780452255500
ISBN-10: 0452255503
Publisher: Plume
Publication Date: January 1st, 1983
Pages: 288
Language: English
Series: Plume
Praise for Growing Up and Russell Baker

“A wondrous book, funny, sad, and strong…[with scenes] as funny and touching as Mark Twain's.”—Los Angeles Times Book Review 

“Lovely haunting prose....[Baker] moves beyond the boundaries of his newspaper column to establish a place for this book among the most enduring recollections of American boyhoods—those of Thurber and Mencken, Aldrich and Twain.”—The Washington Post Book World

“One of the most heart-warming, inspiring, nostalgic, funniest, best-written books I have ever read.”—Ann Landers
 
"[Baker is] a precious national resource."—Neil Postman

“The saddest, funniest, most tragical yet comical picture of coming of age in the U.S.A. in the Depression years and World War II that has ever been written.”—Harrison Salisbury

A GENERAL THEORY OF OBLIVION by Agualusa ✯✯special location

Daytime
Wednesday, December 21, 12:30 pm

***The Daytime Book Group will be meeting up the block from the bookstore in P&P's primary classroom for its discussion on December 21, at 12:30 p.m. Here is the address of the classroom: 5039 Connecticut Ave, Unit # 7 – which is the very first door north of Comet Ping Pong in the brick offices on the corner of Connecticut and Nebraska. It is a dark red door that I will post a sign on, so you can be confident you’re entering the right space.***

A General Theory of Oblivion By Jose Eduardo Agualusa, Daniel Hahn (Translated by) Cover Image

A General Theory of Oblivion (Paperback)

$18.00


Special Order—Subject to Availability
Winner of the 2017 Dublin International Literary Award

Shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize 2016

"Who is this solitary young woman on the top floor of a luxury building in Luanda, Angola’s capital, and why has she walled off her apartment? Her name is Ludo…Her brooding presence is inescapable”  Kirkus Reviews

On the eve of Angolan independence, an agoraphobic woman named Ludo bricks herself into her Luandan apartment for 30 years, living off vegetables and the pigeons she lures in with diamonds, burning her furniture and books to stay alive and writing her story on the apartment’s walls.
Almost as if we’re eavesdropping, the history of Angola unfolds in A General Theory of Oblivion through the stories of those Ludo sees from her window in a a wild patchwork of a novel, playing on a love of storytelling and fable.
José Eduardo Agualusa, a writer and journalist, is one of the leading literary voices in Angola and the Portuguese language today. His books have been translated into 25 languages. Four of his books have been translated into English: Creole (2002), winner of the Portuguese Grand Prize for Literature; The Book of Chameleons (2006), which won the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize; My father's wives (2008), and Rainy Season (2009). He has received literary grants from the Centro Nacional da Cultura, the Fundação do Oriente, and the Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst. Agualusa has also written four plays: W generation, O monólogo, Chovem amores na Rua do Matador and A Caixa Preta, the last two written with Mia Couto. 
Daniel Hahn is the author of a number of works of non-fiction. His translation of The Book of Chameleons by José Eduardo Agualusa won the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize in 2007. He has translated the work of José Luís Peixoto, Philippe Claudel, María Dueñas, José Saramago, Eduardo Halfon, Gonçalo M. Tavares, Corsino Fortes, and others.
Product Details ISBN: 9780914671312
ISBN-10: 0914671316
Publisher: Archipelago
Publication Date: December 15th, 2015
Pages: 250
Language: English
Shortlisted for the Man Booker International Prize
Winner of the Dublin International Literary Award

Shortlisted for the Three Percent Best Translated Book Award
Winner of the 2019 Angolan National Prize for Culture and Arts


"Like Portuguese writer Fernando Pessoa and Argentine Jorge Luis Borges, Portuguese-Angolan writer José Eduardo Agualusa is a literary trickster who dazzles with his artificial fictional creations... Agualusa is a master of varied genre structure, and he has great fun shifting from spy novel to pastoral narrative to interior reflection, but his heart is deeply invested in his characters, and each individual's story burns itself into the reader to make us reconsider our capacity for empathy and understanding."
—Minneapolis Star Tribune

"A master storyteller...It’s a tribute to Agualusa’s storytelling that the bittersweet redemption found by his characters feels authentic; he and they have earned it."
—Washington Independent Review of Books

 "The story challenges what we imagine to be the clearly drawn lines between 'hero' and 'villain' and forces a reconsideration of history and our fictions. It does what the best of literature ought to do: keep us glued to our seats, unable to break away."
—Maaza Mengiste, Words Without Borders

"The story of Ludo bricking herself in her apartment on the eve of Angolan independence and staying there for 30 years had me thinking of our present times. What if being indoors becomes the new normal? Would we deal with it as Ludo does and what world do we then find when eventually we get out? Will it be better? But it’s also a book about the redemptive powers of love and how humanity needs each other. Because although Ludo thinks she is okay being alone, when she finally bonds with Sabalu, a young boy who scales her wall, her life changes."
Zukiswa Wanner, Mail & Guardian

"Each page brimming with imagination."
The Irish Independent

"In this tale, based on real-life events, one of Angola’s most inventive novelists has found the perfect vehicle to examine his country’s troubled recent past. . . Alongside Mozambique’s Mia Couto (shortlisted for this year’s Man Booker International), Agualusa has already become one of lusophone Africa’s most distinctive voices."
Financial Times

"The translation ... is seamless, with the light detachment and readability of Louis de Bernières at his best, but combined with the sharp insights of JM Coetzee ... Agualusa’s writing is a delight throughout, as he opens up the world of Portuguese-speaking Africa to the English-speaking community. And what a world it is."
The Scotsman

"Hahn is one of our most experienced translators. Such experience shows in tiny interventions to guide the English reader through the chaos of the Angolan battlefield ... and in his taking confident ownership of certain descriptive passages, ensuring the music of the original is conveyed along with the meaning... a timely homage to the prize of Angolan independence."
The Independent

"A General Theory of Oblivion is both more and less than its title; it certainly provides a kind of blueprint of the encroaching obscurity inherent to living and dying—at times bemoaning its certainty, at times celebrating the assured darkness—but it is also a general theory of love, of life, and, finally, of literature. Working in the fertile ground between fiction, philosophy, and enchantment, Agualusa has accomplished something strange and marvelous here, a whirling dervish of joy and pain, blood and memory, whose many high points I found myself re-reading immediately, eager to experience the shine of the prose like spun gold. It left me in awe of these stories we tell ourselves: those we need to survive, those that change us, and those that change with us."
—Dustin Illingworth, Quarterly Conversation

"Cross J.M. Coetzee with Gabriel García Márquez and you've got José Eduardo Agualusa, Portugal's next candidate for the Nobel Prize."
—Alan Kaufman, author of Matches

PRAISE FOR THE BOOK OF CHAMELONS

"Humorous and quizzical, with a light touch on weighty themes, the narrative darts about with lizard-like colour and velocity. Agulausa's delightful novel skitters across minefields with grace and poise."
—Boyd Tonkin, The Independent.

"Ingenious, consistently taut and witty."
The Times Literary Supplement

"Strange...elliptical...charming."
Guardian

"A book as brisk as a thriller and as hot and alarming as the most powerful kind of dream."
—Michael Pye, author of The Pieces from Berlin

"A work of fierce originality."
The Independent

"A subtle beguiling story of shifting identities."
Kirkus


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